Ivan Lukáš Abstract:

The purpose of this article is to examine the influence of the official language policy of the current Ethiopian regime on nation-formation and unification in Ethiopia. We will not only ask if this policy has achieved its objective of building a united, modern Ethiopian nation, but will examine whether there actually is a functional relationship between these two variables. In other words we will ask if the current state of nation-building in Ethiopia can be directly attributed to the official language policy of the country or whether what we observe is only a pattern of disconnected correlations.

Keywords: Language policy, nation-building, Ethiopia This article is supported by research project of IPS, FSV, UK: MSM 0021620841- Development of the Czech Society in the EU: Challenges and Risks.

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Wiles of Spanish in Latin America

Malvína Krausz Hladká

Abstract:

The article outline the spread and role of Spanish language across the region of Latin America and changing nature of this spread from the period of colonization till today – the era of globalization. By this approach I will also seek the answer to a question of the influence of Latin American Spanish in neighboring U. S. hemisphere and through it I will conclude by speculating on the future spread and role of Spanish, particularly in the U. S. and in its interaction with English.

Keywords:

Spanish language, Latin America, language spread, US Spanish, language policies, language and national identity

This article is supported by research project of IPS, FSV, UK: MSM 0021620841- Development of the Czech Society in the EU: Challenges and Risks.

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Language Policy, Practice and Diglossia in Colonial and Post – Colonial Hong Kong

Liyan Hu

Abstract:

The language policy in Hong Kong undergoes both colonization and decolonization at present. In colonial days, the language policy was diglossic or superposed bilingualism. English was treated as ‘high’ language, while Cantonese and Putongh (formerly known as Mandarin were of the ‘low’ status. One of the major changes after the resumption of sovereignty in 1997 is the ‘bi-literacy and trilingualism’ language policy, to balance the status of English, Cantonese (a commonly spoken local language in Hong Kong) and Putonghua (the national spoken language in mainland China); this is in accordance with the ‘mother tongue’ education policy. This paper examines the language policy with certain politically-driven practices in education, the workplace as well as daily common and official life in pre-colonial and post-colonial Hong Kong; to view the intentions of the colonial government and the motives of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Government, as well as to examine the response of Hong Kong society to the language issues during the transition of political power.

Keywords:

language policy, diglossia, hegemony, medium of instruction, political transition, globalization and decolonization

This article is supported by research project of IPS, FSV, UK: MSM 0021620841- Development of the Czech Society in the EU: Challenges and Risks.

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